Tag Archives: node-red

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AiLight – A hackable RGBW light bulb

Some weeks ago a tweet by Manolis Nikiforakis (@niki511) with the #ESP8266 hashtag drew my attention. Manolis had just received a “smart lamp” branded by Ai-Thinker, the AiLight. Yes, the same Ai-Thinker that has sold millions of ESP8266 based modules. Chances were it had an ESP8266 microcontroller inside. Too good not to buy one and take a look at the inside.

Manolis shared the link where he bought his at Ebay for a bit more than USD 10 plus shipping. Unfortunately it’s out of stock there and there are amazingly few other places where you can buy it. I only found the same product with prices from 12 to 18€ at Ebay as DIY Smart Wifi Light Bulb [Ebay] or at Aliexpress sold as “DIY Wifi LED Bulb E27 5W AC110-240V lampada LED Dimmable Bulb Lamp Remote Control Led Spot Light for iPhone Android Phones” or “1Pcs E27 Dimmable LED Light Bulb Smart Wireless Wifi AC 110V 220V LED Corn Lamp Cold White Warm White Dimming LED Spotlight” [Aliexpress]. Don’t you love those seo-ugly names?

I actually bought two because you never know. And they arrived last Thursday. It took me less that 1 minute to open one of the boxes, pop out the cap and take a look at the inside just to see what I already knew. Time to play 🙂

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Your laundry is done!

MQTT LED Matrix Display

My MQTT network at home moves up and down a lot of messages: sensor values, triggers, notifications, device statuses,… I use Node-RED to forward the important ones to PushOver and some others to a Blynk application. But I also happen to have an LED display at home and that means FUN.

LED displays are cool. Your team’s score, your number in the IRS queue, the estimated arrival time for your next commute,… Now that TVs are replacing LED displays (like the later did with the electromechanical ones) they have acquire an almost vintage-status.

This LED display I own even has a name: The Rentalito. The Rentalito is an old friend, one of those projects you revisit because LED displays are cool… Originally it was an Arduino Uno with an Ethernet Shield in a fancy cardboard case. Then it went WiFi using a WiFly module. And then a SparkCore replaced the Arduino. Now… well, ESP8266 is driving my life.

Let me introduce you the latest iteration of the Rentalito, the MQTT LED matrix display.

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RFM69 WIFI Gateway

Some 3 years ago I started building my own wireless sensor network at home. The technology I used at the moment has proven to be the right choice, mostly because it is flexible and modular.

MQTT is the keystone of the network. The publisher-subscriber pattern gives the flexibility to work on small, replaceable, simple components that can be attached or detached from the network at any moment. Over this time is has gone through some changes, like switching from a series of python daemons to Node-RED to manage persistence, notifications and reporting to several “cloud” services.

But MQTT talks TCP, which means you need some kind of translators for other “languages”. The picture below is from one of my firsts posts about my Home Monitoring System, and it shows some components I had working at the time.

Home WSN version 2

All those gears in the image are those translators, sometimes called drivers, sometimes bridges, sometimes gateways. Most of them have been replaced by Node-RED nodes. But not all of them. This is the story of one of those gateways.

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Your laundry is done

Have you ever forgotten your wet clothing inside the washer for a whole day? I have. Even for two days. They smell. You have to wash them again and you know you might end up forgetting about them again!

Actually that is happening to me since me moved to an old house in a town north of Barcelona. Instead of having the washer in the kitchen, like we used to, now we have it in the cellar, in a place I don’t normally pass by to notice the laundry is done.

So I started thinking about monitoring the washer to get notifications when the laundry is done. And since I was at the same time playing with ITead’s Sonoffs, which has an AC/DC transformer and a powerful controller with wifi, it looked like a nice project to put together.

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S20 Smart Switch

S20 Smart Socket

Since I discovered the Sonoff I’ve been thinking about embedding it inside a switch. I started looking for old power meters, timers,… I had at home but the Sonoff is a bit too long. Why didn’t they design a square board? I event bought a bulky Kemo STG15 case with socket.

Next I decided to design my own board. It is meant to be the “official” hardware for the ESPurna project so it’s called ESPurna too. It’s opensource hardware and available at the ESPurna project repository at Bitbucket. I have some boards already for the first iteration (version 0.1). They are mostly OK but I’m already working on a revision.

But then ITead’s released their S20 Smart Socket. It’s the Sonoff in a wall socket enclosure. Almost 100% what I wanted. And at 11.70€ it’s hard to beat. There are other wifi smart sockets available, mainly Orvibo and BroadLink (an SP2 Centros should be arriving home anyday now) but ITead’s is cheaper and you can easily re-flash it. Just solder a 4 pins header, connect it to your FTDI programmer, hold the S20 button, connect the programmer to your computer and flash. Done.

OK, not so fast. Why would I do that? Why would I change the stock firmware?

The answer for me is a mixed up of philosophy and practicity. But you are right. Let’s go step by step.

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