Tag Archives: node-red

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Monitor your TTN gateways with Node-RED

This time I’d like to write a quick post about a small project we’ve been working on at the The Things Network community in Barcelona (@ttncat). We were worried about the monitoring of the gateways we have deployed, both as a community but also as individuals. Some of our partners have also deployed their own gateways and they are part of the community.

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So how do we get (almost) real-time notifications of incidences in the local TTN network? We want to be able to track them as soon as possible and open the proper ticket in our management system to solve them if the solution is in our hands or notify the entity responsible for the gateway.

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Useful notifications from your home appliances using Node-RED

Some time ago I worked on a home project to get a notification when my washing machine had done its job based on monitoring its power consumption. There was a good reason for that, the machine was outside the house and I had already forgotten about the laundry several times. And when that happens your only option is to wash it again, because it really smells musty…

Monitoring your appliances

Use ESPurna 🙂

OK, there are different ways to get the info about power consumption. But since we want to be able to process the data ourselves most commercial products won’t be suitable unless we modify it.

Alternatively, those that use radio communication to send data from the meter to the base station might be suitable for a man-in-the-middle hack. For instance, if you own an Efergy power meter you must know you can sniff the data it sends using a simple RTL-SDR dongle.

But for most cases, your best chance is to get your hands on a commercial product with an ESP8266 chip in it and change the firmware to suit your needs. You can write your own or use an existing firmware like ESPurna, that already supports a bunch of power metering smart switches.

What info do you need?

The idea is to report (via MQTT) power data from each individual appliance very minute. You can then use Node-RED along with InfluxDB and Grafana (or Graphite) to receive, persist and graph your data like in the image below.

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Sonoff B1, lights and shades

Six months ago I was reviewing the AiThinker AiLight, a great looking light bulb with an embedded ESP8266EX microcontroller, driven by a MY9291 LED driver. Just before summer IteadStudio released it’s Sonoff B1 [Itead.cc] light bulb, heavily inspired (probably same manufacturer) by the AiLight, at least on the design.

Now that IteadStudio has become popular between the home automation community you can also find the Sonoff B1 on global marketplaces like Ebay or Aliexpress for around 13€.

A closer look at the B1 uncovers some important differences. But before going deeper into the details let me first say that this post will probably look more like a review, at least more than I use to write. And second, yes: ESPurna supports the Sonoff B1 🙂

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Hacking the Sonoff RF Bridge 433

Itead Studio has been releasing interesting gadgets for the Home Automation community based on a low price tag and extreme hackability. You can google “sonoff” (the main brand for Itead Studio home automation devices) to get more than a million hits, including official pages, reviews and lots of hacks. The ubiquitous ESP8266 (or its sibling ESP8285) is the core of all those devices, using WiFi instead of the traditional RF messages, replacing a remote with mobile apps or voice commands. But also, using custom firmware like ESPurna, technologies and solutions like MQTT, Node-RED or Home Assistant. But one of the latests devices from the chinese firm tries to bridge the gap between those two technologies: the Sonoff RF Bridge 433.

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Using Google Assistant to control your ESP8266 devices

In my last post I tried to explain how to access your IoT devices at home from the Internet in a secure way using a reverse proxy. Truth is that I had it running since maybe 6 months ago without giving it too much use until recently. Reason? My Nexus 5 had been having serious problems (battery not charging, screen broken, earpiece not working,…) and I decided to replace it with a new mobile phone and the new one has Google Assistant built in.

So one of the first things I have tried is to make Google Assistant toggle my smart switches flashed with ESPurna. Nad as it turns out it’s not hard to do but -at the moment- you have to relay on a cloud service like IFTTT (IF This Then That). This is a key difference with Amazon Alexa services you have to be aware. It has some benefits but also some drawbacks.

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